Amalgamated data for English is current as of 2017/10/21 08:28:46

29406

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The reconstructed Elizabethan Gardens at Kenilworth Castle in Kenilworth, Warwickshire.

Queen Elizabeth I had granted Kenilworth Castle to her favourite, Robert Dudley, in 1563 and he spent a fortune transforming it into a luxurious palace fit to receive his queen and her court. The queen visited him there several times on her famous summer progresses away from London.

Her fourth and final visit lasted for 19 days, from 9 to 27 July 1575, the longest she had ever stayed at a courtier’s house. In her honour, Leicester built sumptuous apartments especially for her use, with large airy windows with superb views, huge fires and a whole chamber dedicated to one of the queen’s great passions – dancing. Decorated with dazzling plasterwork, hung with rich tapestries and furnished sumptuously, this would have been the summit of Elizabethan luxury.

Leicester also devised the most lavish series of entertainments for the queen, and took as much care with the surrounding landscape as he had with the buildings, embellishing his park with bowers, arbours, seats and walks. He wanted Elizabeth’s privy, or private, garden to be as magnificent an outdoor space as the interiors he had created for her. Two detailed accounts of the festivities survive, one written by the poet and actor George Gascoigne, the other by Robert Langham, keeper of the council chamber door. It is from Langham, a minor official, that we have the description of the garden.

Although it was designed as a privy garden, closed to all but the queen’s closest companions, one day, while the queen was out hunting, Adrian the gardener allowed Langham to sneak inside. Langham’s account is written in the form of a long letter, in a curious style which has provoked a great deal of debate. Although he cannot have visited the garden for more than a few hours, Langham left an extremely detailed description of its features. The accuracy of his account is borne out by archaeological evidence, which confirms that an eight-sided fountain once stood at the centre of the garden, just as he claims.

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The 2014 Bracebridge Heath Scarecrow Trail, Bracebridge Heath, Lincolnshire.

This was the third year of the reoccurring event with the 2014 theme being nursery rhymes.

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The 8th annual Lincoln BIG Mini Day, held in 2015 alongside Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire.

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The Kesteven Morris Dancers taking part in the conclusion of the 2014 Lincoln BIG Morris Dancing Festival outside Lincoln cathedral, Minsters Yard, Lincoln, Lincolnshire.

Dance groups from across the East Midlands will converge on Lincoln for a day of Morris dancing, filling the streets with the vibrant colours and sounds of an ancient English tradition.

Groups of dancers will perform in Lincoln city centre and Lincoln's Cathedral Quarter as part of the Lincoln BIG Morris Dancing Festival. The celebrations will see around 250 dancers and more than 20 Morris groups sing, dance to music and clash sticks in colourful costumes.

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Lickey Hills Country Park, one of the oldest parks managed by Birmingham City Council. Close to Barnt Green, in Birmingham, West Midlands.

The first evidence of people settling in the Lickey Hills date back to the stone age when a Neolithic hunter lost a flint arrow head on Rednal Hill. The arrow head is leaf-shaped and made of flint and is certainly over 4,000 years old. Additionally a 3,000 year old flint javelin point was found lying on the surface by an observant Mr W H Laurie when the Lickey's road-widening was taking place in 1925.

The Romans constructed a Roman road over the Lickeys very near to the present Rose Hill gap, before it swung north and followed the route of the present day Bristol Road South. The road would have been used to transport salt and other goods between the Roman encampments at Worcester and Metchley, near where Birmingham's Queen Elizabeth Hospital now stands. It would have also been used as a military marching route by Roman soldiers.

In Norman times the Lickeys formed part of the royal manor of Bromsgrove and were set aside as a royal hunting forest. As well as stocking the area with deer, the Normans deliberately introduced rabbits to the area that were kept in large enclosures, or 'warrens' hence the road and place names. The word 'forest' means 'place of deer' and did not necessarily mean that the area was totally covered with trees.

The manor was sold by crown charter in 1682 to the Earl of Plymouth. The Earl lived at nearby Tardebigge and his descendants would own the lands at Longbridge, Rednal, Cofton Hackett and the Lickey Hills for the next 250 years.

In 1888 the Birmingham Society for the Preservation of Open Spaces purchased Rednal Hill and handed it to the City in trust. They also arranged for Pinfield Wood and Bilberry Hill to be leased on a peppercorn (nominal) rent. Birmingham City Council finally purchased Cofton Hill, Lickey Warren and Pinfield Wood outright in 1920. With the eventual purchase of the Rose Hill Estate from the Cadbury family in 1923, free public access was finally restored to the entire hills.

For many Birmingham and Black Country people, the Lickey Hills were a traditional day out. When the Birmingham tram network was extended to the Rednal terminus it would carry the crowds from all over the city to the Lickeys. There are records of crowds as far back as the Rose and Crown on busy Sundays, as families queued for the trams to take them home. The terminus and tram tracks were removed in 1953.

In 1904, J. R. R. Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, moved to Rednal with his mother, who had been ill and was convalescing. The hills became a favourite haunt and are thought to be an inspiration for the mythical Shire, where the hobbits lived in his books.

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The 2014 Lincoln Classic Car Rally held alongside Brayford Pool, in Lincoln, Lincolnshire.

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Racecourse Colliery at The Black Country Living Museum, Dudley, West Midlands.

The ground beneath the Museum site was once mined for coal, limestone, fireclay, and ironstone. More than 40 old mine shafts are shown on old plans and around one of these shafts, Racecourse Colliery has been built as a typical small Black Country coalpit. Small scale, ‘rough and ready’ pits were common in the Black Country. There were once as many as 500 or 600 of these pits across the region. The colliery was so named because the land on which it stands was originally the Dudley Racecourse which was closed when the railway line from Dudley to Wolverhampton was built in 1846.

Racecourse Colliery is shown as it would have been in about 1910 with the Manager's Office in the weighbridge house from Rolfe Street in Smethwick, the typical hovel and blacksmith's shop. It represents a typical Black Country coal, or fire clay mine.

The mine shaft which forms the centre-piece of Racecourse Colliery was originally the Earl of Dudley’s Coneygree Colliery Pit No. 126. It operated between 1860 and 1902, before being abandoned and the shaft filled in. The wooden pit frame stands over a shaft 30 metres deep and a cylinder outside drum steam powered winding engine would wind the cage up and down the shaft.

In the nineteenth century commentators spoke of this region as a great coalfield, and of the “earth turned inside out” by all the mining activity. It was coal mining which was at the heart of the industrialisation of the Black Country. A pit like this could have been started up by a few men, possibly miners themselves, who would rent the mineral rights from the land owner. In this area, that was usually the Earl of Dudley. Alternatively, the Earl of Dudley could mine the coal himself and appoint an agent or a manager to run his pits for him.

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The former Calico, which since this photo has been taken is now the Mill Street Pub & Kitchen, 6 Mill Street, Oakham, Rutland.

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Crossing train tracks in Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

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Tower of the Grade II* Listed red brick and terracotta The Principal (originally the Refuge Assurance building), on Oxford Street in Manchester, Greater Manchester.

The first phase of this Grade II* listed building was designed for the Refuge Assurance Company by Alfred Waterhouse and built 1891–1895. The inside was of Burmantofts faience and glazed brick. The ground floor was one enormous open business hall. It was extended, with a striking 217-foot (66 m) tower, along Oxford Street by his son Paul Waterhouse in 1910–1912. It was further extended along Whitworth Street by Stanley Birkett in 1932.

After occupying the building as offices for nearly a century, the Refuge Assurance Company departed the building for a new purpose site in the grounds of Fulshaw Hall, Cheshire on Friday 6 November 1987. The Refuge Assurance company had discussed converting the building into a new home for the Hallé Orchestra with one of Manchester's cultural patrons Sir Bob Scott for over a year. The £3 million funding required for the project did not materialise and the Halle subsequently moved from the Free Trade Hall to the new Bridgewater Hall upon opening in 1996.

Local architecture critic John Parkinson-Bailey noted that "one of the most prestiguous and expensive buildings in Manchester lay forlorn and empty except for a caretaker and the ghost on its staircase". It was converted to a hotel by Richard Newman in 1996 at a cost of £7 million, and was named the Palace Hotel, owned and operated by the Principal Hotel Company. The hotel is purported to be haunted. The hotel was rebranded 'The Principal Manchester' in November 2016.

The building is also now home to restaurant and bar 'The Refuge by Volta' which sits on the corner of Oxford Street and Whitworth Street. Developed in collaboration with DJs-turned-restaurateurs Luke Cowdrey and Justin Crawford of the award-winning Volta restaurant in West Didsbury.

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Tram tracks heading towards the Grade II Listed Manchester Victoria Railway Station, in Manchester, Greater Manchester.

It is the city's second largest mainline railway station and one of nine Metrolink tram stops within the city zone. It lies to the north of the city centre on Hunts Bank, close to Manchester Cathedral. Victoria is Manchester's tertiary station (after Piccadilly and Oxford Road) in the Manchester station group and the busiest station managed by Northern.

In 1838 Samuel Brooks, vice-chairman of the Manchester and Leeds Railway (M&LR) bought land at Hunt's Bank close to the cathedral and presented it to the company for a station to replace the inconveniently located Manchester Oldham Road railway station opened by the company on 3 July 1839. The station was a long, low single-storey building designed by George Stephenson and completed by John Brogden on 1 January 1844. It was named Victoria by permission of Queen Victoria. The long single platform handled M&LR trains to Leeds and elsewhere at its eastern end. The Liverpool and Manchester Railway extended its line from Ordsall, near the original Manchester Liverpool Road railway station, and its trains operated from Victoria's western end from 4 May 1844.

By the mid-1840s six railway companies operated from the station connecting Manchester to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Leeds and Sheffield. Victoria Station came to dominate the Long Millgate area and was one of the biggest passenger stations in Britain.

Victoria was enlarged by William Dawes, who is responsible for most of its facade, in 1909. The enlarged station was erected on land consecrated as a burial ground on 1 January 1815 by the Bishop of Chester; it was acquired by the Manchester and Leeds Railway in 1844. The enlarged station had 17 platforms. Wealthy commuters travelled from Blackpool and Southport faster than is possible today (e.g. 45 minutes from Southport in 1910, 67 today; and 65 minutes from Blackpool in 1910, 77 today) in specially-constructed club cars hauled by express steam locomotives. The non-stop services were abandoned in the early 1960s.

The station predominantly hosts local and regional services to destinations in Northern England, such as Rochdale, Bradford, Leeds, Newcastle, Huddersfield, Wigan, Southport, Blackpool and Liverpool using the original Liverpool to Manchester line. Most trains calling at Victoria are operated by Northern, except for TransPennine Express services from Liverpool to Newcastle and during engineering works, when some trains are diverted from Piccadilly.

Manchester Victoria is also a major interchange of the Metrolink light rail system. Several former railway lines into the station have been converted to tram operation: The line to Bury was converted in the early 1990s as part of the first phase of the Metrolink system, and the line through Oldham to Rochdale was converted during 2009–2014. Trams switch to on-street running once they emerge from Victoria Station and continue southwards through the city centre to Piccadilly or Deansgate-Castlefield.

Domed!

Anthony P26 posted a photo:

Domed!

My 1000 picture posted on Flickr. Thank you to everyone for views, comments, favs and most of all inspiration and motivation over the months and years. It's a great pleasure enjoying our shared hobby/passion together!

Best wishes!

Have a great weekend!

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Eastside City Park an urban park located in the Eastside district of Birmingham City Centre. Designed by architects Patel Taylor with landscape architect Allain Provost, the park was opened to the public on 5 December 2012 at a cost of £11.75 million. Lining the frontage of Millennium Point, the park provides 14,300 square metres of landscaped green space, 310 trees, a 110 metres canal water feature and a public square incorporating 21 jet fountains.

In 2004, discussions began with the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE), outlining the preliminary processes regarding the development of the site. A May 2007 Big Lottery Fund request was filed for £25million, but was rejected in October of the same year. Birmingham City Council later pledged £5million to begin the project.

The park runs from the remaining portion of Park Street Gardens, northwards past the Masshouse development where and in an easterly direction along Curzon Street, past Curzon Street railway station and Millennium Point; the park terminates at the front of Birmingham City University's "Parkside" campus building.

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The Grade II Listed Park Row Synagogue, 9 Park Row, Bristol, Avon.

Park Row Synagogue was constructed in 1870-1 on the site of a convent, set within a former stone quarry. One third of the building cost is thought to have been spent on cutting into the surrounding bedrock and levelling the ground for the foundation work. The synagogue buildings, including prayer hall, clergy house and communal hall, were designed by Hyman Henry Collins of London (circa 1832-1905), with the assistance of the Bristol architect Samuel Charles Fripp in Italianate style. A number of religious fixtures in the building were reused from the Temple Street synagogues, and from elsewhere. The synagogue was consecrated on 9th September 1871.

Additional ancillary buildings, including a Succah and a communal hall, were built at the rear of the plot in 1906 and 1910. Ornamental gates were added to the entrance in 1921, and were altered in the 20th Century to improve security. In 1933 the prayer hall windows were replaced with the current units. During the bombardment of Bristol during WWII, the synagogue escaped a direct hit, although the stability of the roof was compromised by nearby shelling, requiring its replacement in 1960. In 1975 the gallery to the prayer hall was altered to provide an additional room to the rear.

In the 1980s, the rear buildings of 1906/10 were substantially demolished. The front boundary railings and gates, which had been removed during WWII, were replaced in the late-20th Century. In the 21th Century the building continues to be used by the Bristol Hebrew Congregation, Bristol's Orthodox Jewish community.

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The Grade II Listed The Corridor, a Georgian shopping Arcade in Bath, Somerset.

The Corridor has been a prime destination for shoppers in the South West of England ever since the arcade was opened on 12 October 1825. Following in the steps of the fashionable shopping arcades of Paris and London’s Burlington Arcade (built in 1819), The Corridor became one of Britain’s first examples of indoor, covered arcades. Over 10,000 people and local dignitaries attended the opening of the arcade which was designed and built by local architect Henry Edmund Goodridge.

Steeped in history, The Corridor has had its fair share of famous traders. Back in 1849, J Breeze Esq, a Hire Cutter and Perfumer at No 4 The Corridor placed an advert in the Bath Directory informing the “Gentry, notability and public in general” of his “many years of study and experience into the invention of Hair Dye which effectually changes red or grey hair in a few minutes to a beautiful black or brown and is warranted to stand in any climate”. Today in the arcade you’ll find an eclectic mix of Bath’s highest quality independent retailers alongside well loved household names.

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Lewins Mead, Bristol, Avon.

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The Grade II* Listed Methodist Centenary Chapel, 5 Nursery Street, Market Rasen, West Lindsey, Lincolnshire.

Built in 1863, an immensely impressive classical style nonconformist chapel of brick with stone dressings. Tall prostyle Ionic portico of four columns and four pilasters. Three round headed doorways with boldly rusticated surrounds and heavy keystones, topped with a cornice and miniature pediment. 3 windows above, round headed sashes with blind balustrades below. Rusticated quoins with bold stringcourse below first floor windows, stone dentil cornice above and slate roof. Side elevations of six bays. Two end bays slightly projecting with quoins. Lower windows sashed with moulded surrounds, upper with round heads, and moulded round hoods. Centre four bays, attached arcade with giant stock brick pilasters. Parish room dated 1891 attached to south east corner. Two sets of gatepiers with heavy iron railings and gates. Most of original fittings survive, internally, including box pews, oval gallery and grand double-decker pulpit.

Market Rasen is a small market town on the edge of the Lincolnshire Wolds. The town lies on the main road between Lincoln and Grimsby, the A46 and is on National Cycle Route 1 (part of EuroVelo 12) of the National Cycle Network. In 2001 the town had a population of 3,200. Originally "Rasen", as it is known locally, was called "East Rasen", "Rasen Parva" or "Little Rasen".

The River Rase flows through the town and is crossed by Jameson Bridge, Caistor Road Bridge and Crane Bridge. Market days are Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. On each Tuesday there is an auction of goods and produce, and on the first Tuesday of every month, a farmers' market. Every Friday the Women's Institute holds a country market.

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Walking on the Northern walls of Lincoln Castle, a Grade I Listed Building constructed by William the Conqueror in the 11th Century towards Ellis Windmill and the Cottam power station & West Burton power station in the distant Trent Valley. In Lincoln, Lincolnshire.

Lincoln Castle was during the late 11th century by William the Conqueror on the site of a pre-existing Roman fortress. The castle is unusual in that it has two mottes. It is only one of two such castles in the country, the other being at Lewes in Sussex.

When William the Conqueror defeated Harold Godwinson and the English at The Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066, he continued to face resistance to his rule in the north of England. For a number of years, William's position was very insecure. In order to project his influence northwards to control the people of the Danelaw (an area traditionally under the control of Scandinavian settlers), he constructed a number of major castles in the north and midlands of England. It was at this time that the new king built major castles at Warwick, Nottingham and York. After gaining control of York, the Conqueror turned southwards and arrived at the Roman and Viking city of Lincoln.

When William reached Lincoln (one of the country's major settlements), he found a Viking commercial and trading centre with a population of 6,000 to 8,000. The remains of the old Roman walled fortress located 60 metres (200 ft) above the countryside to the south and west, proved an ideal strategic position to construct a new castle. Also, Lincoln represented a vital strategic crossroads of the following routes (largely the same routes which influenced the siting of the Roman fort):

Ermine Street - a major Roman road and the Kingdom's principal north-south route connecting London and York.
Fosse Way - another important Roman route connecting Lincoln with the city of Leicester and the south-west of England
The Valley of the River Trent (to the west and southwest) - a major river affording access to the River Ouse, and thus the major city of York.
The River Witham - a waterway that afforded access to both the Rivers Trent (via the Fossdyke Roman canal at Torksey) and the North Sea via The Wash.
The Lincolnshire Wolds - an upland area to the northeast of Lincoln, which overlooks the Lincolnshire Marsh beyond.

A castle here could guard several of the main strategic routes and form part of a network of strongholds of the Norman kingdom, in Danish Mercia, roughly the area of the country that is today referred to as the East Midlands, to control the country internally. Also (in the case of the Wolds) it could form a center from which troops could be sent to repel Scandinavian landings anywhere on the coast from the Trent to the Welland, to a large extent, by using the roads which the Romans had constructed for the same purpose.

The Domesday Survey of 1086 directly records 48 castles in England, with two in Lincolnshire including one in the county town. Building a castle within an existing settlement sometimes meant existing structures had to be removed, and of the castles noted in the Domesday Book, thirteen included references to property being destroyed to make way for the castle. In Lincoln's case 166 "unoccupied residences" were pulled down to clear the area on which the castle would be built.

Work on the new fortification was completed in 1068. It is probable that at first a wooden keep was constructed which was later replaced with a much stronger stone one. Lincoln Castle is very unusual in having two mottes, the only other surviving example of such a design being at Lewes. To the south, where the Roman wall stands on the edge of a steep slope, it was retained partially as a curtain wall and partially as a revetment retaining the mottes. In the west, where the ground is more level, the Roman wall was buried within an earth rampart and extended upward to form the Norman castle wall. The Roman west gate (on the same site as the castle's westgate) was excavated in the 19th century but began to collapse on exposure, and so was re-buried.

The castle was the focus of attention during the First Battle of Lincoln which occurred on 2 February 1141, during the struggle between King Stephen and Empress Matilda over who should be monarch in England. It was held but damaged, and a new tower, called the Lucy Tower, was built.

Lincoln Castle was again the site of a siege followed by the Second Battle of Lincoln, on 20 May 1217, during the reign of King John in the course of the First Barons' War. This was the period of political struggle which led to the signing of Magna Carta on 15 June 1215. After this, a new barbican was built onto the west and east gates.

As in Norwich and other places, the castle was used as a secure site in which to establish a prison. At Lincoln, the prison Gaol was built in 1787 and extended in 1847. Imprisoned debtors were allowed some social contact but the regime for criminals was designed to be one of isolation, according to the separate system. Consequently, the seating in the prison chapel is designed to enclose each prisoner individually so that the preacher could see everyone but each could see only him. By 1878 the system was discredited and the inmates were transferred to the new jail in the eastern outskirts of Lincoln. The prison in the castle was left without a use until the Lincolnshire Archives were housed in its cells.

The castle is now owned by Lincolnshire County Council and is a scheduled ancient monument. In 2012, a three-year programme of renovation began at the castle. Work involved creating a new exhibition centre in which to display Magna Carta, building visitor facilities, and opening sections of the prison within the castle to the public. The scheme was completed in April 2015, to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta.

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29423

The Grade I Listed remains of Old Sarum a former Iron Age fort, 2 miles north of Salisbury in Wiltshire.

The great monoliths of Stonehenge and Avebury were erected nearby and indications of prehistoric settlement have been discovered from as early as 3000 BC. An Iron Age hillfort was erected around 400 BC, controlling the intersection of two native trade paths and the Hampshire Avon. The site continued to be occupied during the Roman period, when the paths became roads. The Saxons took the British fort in the 6th century and later used it as a stronghold against marauding Vikings. The Normans constructed a motte and bailey castle, a stone curtain wall, and a great cathedral. A royal palace was built within the castle for King Henry I and was subsequently used by Plantagenet monarchs. This heyday of the settlement lasted for around 300 years until disputes between the Wiltshire sheriff and the Salisbury bishop finally led to the removal of the church into the nearby plain. As New Salisbury grew up around the construction site for the new cathedral in the early 13th century, the buildings of Old Sarum were dismantled for stone and the old town dwindled. Its long-neglected castle was abandoned by Edward II in 1322 and sold by Henry VIII in 1514.

The castle grounds were sold by Henry VIII in 1514. Although the settlement was effectively uninhabited, its landowners continued to have parliamentary representation into the 19th century, making it the most notorious of the rotten boroughs that existed before the Reform Act of 1832. Most famously, Old Sarum served as a pocket borough of the Pitt family.

From the reign of Edward II in the 14th century, the 'borough' of Old Sarum elected two members to the House of Commons despite the fact that, from at least the 17th century, it had no resident voters at all. One of the members in the 18th century was William Pitt the Elder. In 1831, Old Sarum had eleven voters, all of whom were landowners who lived elsewhere. This made Old Sarum the most notorious of the rotten boroughs. The 1832 Reform Act completely disfranchised Old Sarum. Old Sarum was an extra-parochial area and became a civil parish in 1858. The civil parish was abolished in 1894.

The site of the castle and cathedral is considered a highly important British monument: it was among the 26 English locations scheduled by the 1882 Ancient Monuments Protection Act, the first such British legislation. This protection has subsequently continued, expanding to include some suburban areas west and southeast of the outer bailey.

W. H. St J. Hope, W. Hawley, and D.H. Montgomerie excavated the site between 1909 and 1915 for the Society of Antiquaries of London. In 1917, during World War I, a site just northeast of Old Sarum along the Portway was developed as the 'Ford Farm' aerodrome. This became Old Sarum Airfield, which remains in operation with a single grass runway. A second excavation occurred in the 1950s under John W G Musty and Philip Rahtz.

In 2014, an on-site geophysical survey of the inner and outer bailey by the University of Southampton revealed its royal palace, as well as the street plan of the medieval city. The survey made use of soil resistivity to electric current, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetometry, and ground-penetrating radar. The team planned to return in 2015 to complete a similar survey of the Romano-British site located south of the hillfort.

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Walking down West Kennet Avenue a line of originally of around 100 pairs of prehistoric standing stones, raised to form a winding 1 1/2 mile ritual link between the pre-existing monuments of Avebury and The Sanctuary. As well as marking the route to Avebury, the stones seem to have acted as grave markers for some members of the Avebury community. South of Avebury, in Wiltshire.

In the 1930s Alexander Keiller, heir to the Keiller marmalade fortune, excavated four graves, all belonging to the Beaker period (about 2500–1800 BC); three contained a single person, but the fourth had the remains of three. These were particularly important people or, possibly, they were buried as sacrificial offerings in some form of ancestor worship. Elsewhere along the Avenue, excavations revealed scatters of human bone, presumably also from burials.

Many of the stones had already disappeared by the time the first record of the Avenue was made, by John Aubrey, in the 17th century. William Stukeley, in the following century, left an account of the massive destruction of the standing stone monuments of Avebury. They were being torn down and broken into fragments for building material.

Alexander Keiller was able to demonstrate that the practice of burying the stones had happened since the Middle Ages when they were possibly associated with pagan worship and considered the work of the devil. Stukeley recorded a similar avenue on the Beckhampton side of the Avebury henge but little of this remains today.

West Kennet Avenue is in the freehold ownership of The National Trust and in English Heritage guardianship. It is managed by The National Trust on behalf of English Heritage, and the two organisations share the cost of managing and maintaining the property.

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